Quantitative Investing


"Efficient market theory is correct in that there are no gross inefficiencies. But we look at anomalies that may be small in size and brief in time. We make our forecast. Then, shortly thereafter, we re-evaluate the situation and revise our forecast and our portfolio. We do this all day long. We're always in and out and out and in. So we're dependent on activity to make money." - Jim Simmons


Big Idea

If computers can beat world champion chess players, shouldn't they be able to beat the traders on Wall Street? That's the thinking behind quant funds, whose name comes from the term "quantitative analysis". The advantage is that computers aren't swayed by emotion, and they obviously react much faster than a person ever could. The problem is that humans have to program those computers, and even computers can make mistakes when they are programmed incorrectly. Remember the saying "garbage in, garbage out". To take advantage of the power of computers, you still have to figure out a superior investment strategy.

The term "quantitative fund" also doesn't tell you anything about the actual investment strategy being used. Any study of a company or an industry based on quantitative data can be considered a quant strategy.

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Jim Simmons

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Ken Griffin

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