human cognition?

 

Hao Wang, PhD

Staff Software Engineer
IBM Silicon Valley Lab
Big Data Group
San Jose, CA
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Blog
Research Interests
Publications & Presentations
Curriculum Vitae(Short version)
Software
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Resources

Last update on September 12, 2012.

 

 

About Me

My current research interests center around the structure and learning of languages and also include broad issues in Cognitive Science. With a background in engineering, I purse them from two different perspectives: child language acquisition of the psychology approach and natural language processing of the AI approach. I also have a broad interest in the neural basis of language and cognition.

In pursuing my PhD in Psychology, I conduct computational analysis and modeling on corpora of child-directed speech to study early syntax acquisition, specifically distributional information in child-directed speech as a cue for categorizing lexical and functional categories. In the mean time, I worked on several projects at the Information Sciences Institute that applies current natural language processing methods to problems like extracting topics from journal publications.

My skills include computer programming, analysis of natural language and speech data, current natural language processing techniques and high-performance computing.

Research Interests

First Language Acquisition, Computational Modeling of Language Development, Neural Basis of Language and Cognition, (Statistical) Natural Language Processing and Machine learning

Publications

Wang, H. (2012). Acquisition of functional categories. Unpublished Ph.D. dissertation, University of Southern California, Los Angeles. PDF

Wang, H., Can, D., Kazemzadeh, A., Bar, F., & Narayanan, S. (2012). A System for Real-time Twitter Sentiment Analysis of 2012 U.S. Presidential Election Cycle, Proceedings of the ACL 2012 System Demonstrations (pp. 115-120). Jeju Island, Korea: Association for Computational Linguistics. PDF

Wang, H., & Mintz, T. H. (2010). From Linear Sequences to Abstract Structures: Distributional Information in Infant-direct Speech. Paper presented at the 34th annual Boston University Conference on Language Development, Boston, MA. PDF

Wang, H., & Mintz, T. H. (2008). A Dynamic Learning Model for Categorizing Words Using Frames. Paper presented at the 32nd annual Boston University Conference on Language Development, Boston, MA. PDF

Presentations

Wang, H., & Mintz, T. H. (2011). Using ‘overlap’ as a measure of young children’s syntactic knowledge. Poster presented at AMLaP 2011, Paris, France. PDF

Wang, H., Höhle, B., Ketrez, F. N., Küntay, A. C., & Mintz, T. H. (2010). Cross-Linguistic Distributional Analyses with Frequent Frames: the Cases of German and Turkish. 35th Annual Boston University Conference on Language Development, Boston, MA. PDF

Wang, H., & Mintz, T. H. (2009). From Linear Sequences to Abstract Structures: Distributional Information in Infant-direct Speech. Poster presented at 34th annual Boston University Conference on Language Development, Boston, MA. PDF

Wang, H., & Mintz, T. H. (2009). From linear sequences to abstract structures: Distributional information in infant-direct speech. 2009 Symposium on Cognitive and Language Development, Los Angeles, CA. PPT

Höhle, B., Wang, H., & Mintz, T. H. (2008). Syntactic categorization of new words: Distributional and morphological cues to form class. XXIX International Congress of Psychology 2008.

Wang, H., & Mintz, T. H. (2008). A Dynamic Learning Model for Categorizing Words Using Frames. Sandyneck Southern California Symposium on Cognitive and Language Development, Irvine, CA.

Wang, H., & Mintz, T. H. (2007). A Dynamic Learning Model for Categorizing Words Using Frames. 32nd annual Boston University Conference on Language Development, Boston, MA. PPT PPTX

Software

A Java wrapper for Minipar

Foobar2000 0.9 Component

Sequence File Randomizer v1.1 for Neuroscan Stim2

Progress Indicator V1.0 (PHP Class)

Chinese Text to Speech (CTTS) ActiveX Control

Voice Chat system (Voice Over Net)

Resources

Spring 2012 Cognitive Development Brown Bag Series, USC Psychology Department

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