Curriculum Vitae

Education

Ph.D., Philosophy, University of Southern California School of Philosophy,
August 2011
Dissertation Title: Demonstratives in Logic and Natural Language
Dissertation Advisor: Scott Soames

Ph.D. Candidate, Philosophy, University of California (UC), Davis, 2001 – 2004

M.A., Philosophy, Tufts University, June 2001

Honors B.A., Celtic Studies and Literary Studies, University of Toronto, June 1997

Areas of Research Specialization and Teaching Competence

AOS: Philosophy of Language, Philosophical Logic

AOC: Logic, Metaphysics, Epistemology, History of Analytic Philosophy, Philosophy of Mind

Other areas of teaching competence: Environmental Ethics, Love in Philosophy and Literature

Fellowships and Awards

USC Summer Dissertation Award, Summer 2008, Summer 2009

USC School of Philosophy Flewelling Summer Research Award, Summer 2006

UC Davis Summer Research Award, Summer 2002

University of California Eugene Cota-Robles Fellow, 2001 – 2003

Publications

“Reference and Ambiguity in Complex Demonstratives,” to appear in Reference and Referring: Topics in Contemporary Philosophy, v. 10, (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press)

Conference Presentations

“Logical Truth and Consequence in the Logic of Demonstratives,” Arché Conference on Foundations of Logical Consequence, June 2010

“Demonstratives and Pragmatic Ambiguity,” Inland Northwest Philosophy Conference, “Reference and Referring,” April 2010

“An Ambiguity Theory of Complex Demonstratives,” USC Philosophy Department Colloquium, April 2010

“Complex Demonstratives, Indexicality, and Ambiguity,” USC Linguistics-Philosophy Graduate Student Workshop, December 2009

“Context and Compositionality: A Reply to Jessica Rett,” Berkeley-Stanford-Davis Graduate Student Conference in Philosophy, April 2007

“Linguistic Intuitions and Linguistic Theory,” Berkeley-Stanford-Davis Graduate Student Conference in Philosophy, April 2005

“A Case of Mistaken Identity,” Rutgers-Princeton Graduate Student Conference in Philosophy, April 2003

Conference Comments

Comments on Sohi, “Do We Use Demonstratives Intentionally?” Inland Northwest Philosophy Conference, “Reference and Referring,” April 2010

Comments on Rettler, “Simple Persistence,” USC-UCLA Graduate Student Conference in Philosophy, February 2009

Comments on McGlynn, “The Price of Bivalence,” USC-UCLA Graduate Student Conference in Philosophy, February 2006

Comments on Doan, “Intention, Interpretation, and Social Anti-individualism,” Berkeley-Stanford-Davis Graduate Student Conference in Philosophy, April 2005

Comments on Krizan, “Definitely Definite Higher Order Paradox,” Northwest Philosophy Conference, October 2004

Comments on Hom, “Propositions and Attitudes,” Berkeley-Stanford Graduate Student Conference in Philosophy, April 2002

Other Presentations

“William Perry’s Scheme of Intellectual and Ethical Development and the Pedagogy of Writing 140,” USC Writing Center Professional Development Seminar, March 2008

“A Brief Introduction to Philosophy Papers for Writing Consultants,” USC Writing Center Professional Development Seminar, October 2008

Teaching

Primary Instructor

Teaching Assistant

Writing Consultant, USC Writing Center, Fall 2005 – Present

Service

Managing Editor, Pacific Philosophical Quarterly, Wiley-Blackwell, Summer 2011

Chair, "Antonymy in the Attitudes," Pacific APA Puzzles and Paradoxes Colloquium, April 2011

Managing Editor, Pacific Philosophical Quarterly, Wiley-Blackwell, 2006 – 2010

Referee, USC/UCLA Graduate Student Conference in Philosophy, 2006 – 2010

Chair, “Dirty Cheap Contextualism,” Pacific APA Philosophy of Language Colloquium, March 2008

Steering Committee, USC/UCLA Graduate Student Conference in Philosophy, Fall 2006 –Spring 2007

Organizer, USC Workshop in the Linguistics/Philosophy Interface, “Syntax and Semantics with Attitude,” Fall 2004 – Spring 2005

Selected Graduate Coursework

Courses marked with an asterisk were audited.

Logic/Philosophy of Logic

Philosophy of Language/Linguistics

Metaphysics/Epistemology

Philosophy of Mind

Ethics

History of Philosophy

Reading Groups

Empty Names and Fictional Names, USC, Spring 2008
Texts: “Reference and Essence: The John Locke Lectures” (Saul Kripke)
“Empty Names, Fictional Names, Mythical Names” (David Braun)

Minimalism in Syntax, USC, Summer 2007
Texts: Minimalist Syntax: Exploring the Structure of English (Andrew Radford)
Syntax (Andrew Carnie)

Scott Soames’s Beyond Rigidity, UC Davis, Winter 2004
Text: Beyond Rigidity (Scott Soames)

Atomism and Holism, UC Davis, Fall 2003
Text: Holism: A Shopper’s Guide (Jerry Fodor and Ernest Lepore)

The Open Set/Closed Set Distinction in Semantics, UC Davis, Fall 2003
Texts: Lexical Semantics (D. A. Cruse)
Bounds of Logic (Gila Sher)
“Logical Operations” (Vann McGee)

First-Order Logic, UC Davis, Spring 2002
Text: First-Order Logic (Raymond Smullyan)

Gareth Evans’s The Varieties of Reference, Tufts University, Spring 2001
Text: The Varieties of Reference (Gareth Evans)

Mind and Language, Tufts University, Fall 2000
Texts: “The Meaning of ‘Meaning’,” (Hilary Putnam)
The Elm and the Expert (Jerry Fodor)
Mind and World (John McDowell)

Dissertation

Demonstratives in Logic and Natural Language
The singular demonstratives ‘this’ and ‘that’ and complex demonstratives like ‘this sleeping dog’ play a distinctive role in our reasoning practices in natural language. I argue that the classical views of the logic and semantics of demonstratives, developed by David Kaplan, fail to provide an adequate account of this behavior, and I provide an alternative to both. On the view I develop, this behavior of demonstratives in reasoning is a consequence of the way in which we use demonstratives to refer to objects and individuals in the world.

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